Archive for Rodney Hall

Shotgun Party

Posted in Fiction with tags , , , on December 28, 2011 by Jarrod Boyle

Many of the episodes in Mouthful of Stones are ‘true’. However, this doesn’t mean that all of them overtook your humble narrator. This story belongs to a very good friend who had once been a member of the now-defunct armed robbery squad. After hearing it, I inserted a first-person narrator to make it fit the shape of my design. Continue reading

Romanticism

Posted in Love letters, Pornography with tags , , , on August 25, 2011 by Jarrod Boyle

Every time I’m wounded, I bleed in romantic colours. Continue reading

A Genius for a Friend

Posted in Journalism, Reading with tags , , , , , on January 15, 2011 by Jarrod Boyle

It’s great to have a genius for a friend; it guarantees often exhilarating conversations.  Continue reading

Rejection!

Posted in Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 8, 2010 by Jarrod Boyle

Dear Jarrod,

Thank you for sending me Finding Cronos, and for giving Murdoch Books the opportunity to consider publishing your manuscript. I think the questions and themes you wanted to explore through your story do have merit, however I think the writing and structure of your manuscript still needs more work. Continue reading

The Lost Art of Reading

Posted in Reading with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 4, 2010 by Jarrod Boyle

The Lost Art of Reading

This entry takes its title from Rodney Hall’s keynote address at the 2010 Byron Bay Writer’s Festival. I had hoped to begin with a link to the lecture which I believe the ABC filmed and will eventually upload onto youtube. While googling, I found this interview, which is a really interesting introduction to the man.

http://blog.booktopia.com.au/2010/04/27/feature-rodney-hall-author-of-popeye-never-told-you-answers-ten-terrifying-questions/ Continue reading

Courage

Posted in Kickboxing, Reading with tags , , , , , , , on August 28, 2010 by Jarrod Boyle

“Cowardice… is something a man does. What passes through his mind is his own affair.”

-Lord Moran

Nikos Kazantzakis’ novel, The Last Temptation, remains wildly controversial. Black-listed by the Vatican shortly after publication in 1960, Kazantzakis took a number of significant liberties with the ‘official’ story of Christ, as told in the gospels. Judas is a very close friend; the only disciple with the strength of character to betray a Jesus who instructs him to do it. Agonising death on the cross has been revealed to Christ through a premonition as the will of God.

While we all know the story of the crucifixion, the raw facts have been obscured by accretions of sentimentality and tradition. The fundamental fact is that Christ was tortured to death. Continue reading

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