Archive for the Pretensions toward cultural theory Category

Mirror Mirror

Posted in Pretensions toward cultural theory, trauma with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 19, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

‘I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions.
Whatever I see I swallow immediately
Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike.
I am not cruel, only truthful‚
The eye of a little god, four-cornered.’

‘Mirror’

By Sylvia Plath.

Todd Sampson is full of shit.

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Ex Machina

Posted in Film, Pretensions toward cultural theory with tags , , , , , , , on August 26, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

2.

Bluebeard is the grisly tale of a powerful, wealthy nobleman who marries a young, innocent peasant girl. She discovers, while he is away, that her new husband has beheaded his previous wives once they have ceased to amuse him. In part, it is a cautionary tale about a rich, powerful man’s objectification of a young, naive woman.

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Ex Machina

Posted in Film, Pretensions toward cultural theory with tags , , , , on August 24, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

I tend to peruse my Netflix and Stan accounts with dismay. Firstly, they clash with the portrait I paint of myself socially, as someone who ‘doesn’t watch television.’ Secondly, I find that I’ll open an account with a streaming service because I want to see something specific, like Parasite, for example, and then I’m confounded by the volume of crap I don’t want to see that comes with it.

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The Neon Demon

Posted in Film, Pretensions toward cultural theory with tags , , , , , , , , on June 14, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

“Evil floats, weightlessly across the landscape of Los Angeles in Nicolas Winding Refn’s new film, The Neon Demon, co-scripted with TV writer Mary Laws and British dramatist Polly Stenham. It is a reverie of such sheer satanic rapture that Refn could be on danger of taking Bret Easton Elis’ crown as the Aleister Crowley of the 21st century.”

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A Promising Young Woman

Posted in Film, Pretensions toward cultural theory, violence against women with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

I was fairly horrified by the film ‘A Promising Young Woman’, especially the murder at the end.

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Flannery O’Connor Hates You

Posted in Observation, Pretensions toward cultural theory with tags , , , , , , on March 20, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

I’d never read Flannery O’Connor until lockdown. I’d seen her listed as one of the outstanding writers of the twentieth century, specifically in terms of her short stories. I had time on my hands, so I bought her collected works.

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Happy 60th Birthday, Henry Rollins

Posted in Pretensions toward cultural theory, Real Men, resistance training with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

The first disturbing event of first-year university was the day I went to meet a childhood friend of mine when he was discharged from the insane asylum.

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Why I Don’t Believe in the Patriarchy (But Still Consider Myself a Feminist)

Posted in Pretensions toward cultural theory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

2.

When Lisa Wilkinson explained on ‘The Project’ television program that Eurydice Dixon was murdered by a man who was the pointy end of a patriarchal culture which is driven to murder women as it sexualises them, I was outraged.

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Why I Don’t Believe in the Patriarchy (But Still Consider Myself A Feminist).

Posted in Pretensions toward cultural theory with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

1.

The patriarchy is like Satan, the Easter Bunny and Santa Claus. Sure, there’s some kind of cause and effect involved, but the figure itself is bought into being by those wanting to explain more subtle and complex phenomena, but are happy to settle for an easy answer with a face on it.

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‘Ashes in Your Mouth’: Spending Time in Giovanni’s Room.

Posted in Pretensions toward cultural theory, Reading on February 7, 2021 by Jarrod Boyle

“You think,” [Jacques] persisted, “That my life is shameful because my encounters are. And they are. But you should ask yourself why they are.”

“Why are they – shameful?”

“Because there is no affection in them, and no joy. It’s like putting an electric plug in a dead socket. Touch, but no contact. All touch, but no contact and no light.”

“I asked him, ‘Why?”

“That you must ask yourself,” he told me, “And perhaps one day this morning will not be ashes in your mouth.”

– James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room,

P. 49

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