Archive for Commonwealth Games

Omari Kimweri: Fighting Fugitive

Posted in Boxing, fighting, Journalism, Real Men with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 12, 2016 by Jarrod Boyle

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FightLive Magazine, June/July 2016

“Life is easier when I’m boxing,” says Omari Kimweri, once Tanzanian, now Australian flyweight boxer currently in-line for the WBC silver title. This is a remarkable statement, especially when you consider it in the light of what he’s had to do to stay in the game. Continue reading

Ben Edwards – Australian Boxing Champion

Posted in fighting, Kickboxing, Martial Arts, Real Men with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2015 by Jarrod Boyle

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How about these rugby players?

There’s a difference between being a fighter and being an athlete. I’ve been in situations in a fight were I can feel my brain is swelling inside my head. You ask yourself a question in situations like that. Continue reading

Ben Edwards – Australian Boxing Champion

Posted in fighting, Kickboxing, Martial Arts, Real Men with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2015 by Jarrod Boyle

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Ben Edwards is always good for a chat. Since last we spoke, he has added Australian Heavyweight Boxing Champion to his string of achievements. He was kind enough to do a lap of the Theme Park in order to fill us in on the details.

What happened with Glory? Continue reading

Cheryl Lynch-Gardner and the Red Brigade

Posted in Journalism, Kickboxing, Real Men with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 13, 2015 by Jarrod Boyle

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Blitz Martial Arts Magazine, Vol.28, No.11, November 2014

“The problem in India is not that there are rapists,” says Cheryl Lynch-Gardner, co-founder of Budo-Ryu Kempo. “[Here in Australia there are] Rape Crisis Centers, counseling; there is a system. There’s no damn system over there.”

Cheryl’s involvement in the martial arts has led to her from Sydney’s western suburbs, halfway around the world to teach self-defense to Indian women. It seems like a practical fix for a universal problem, but in the macro, Cheryl’s work is part of a widespread effort to turn the tides of history and culture, one person at a time. Continue reading

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