Archive for Tolstoy

Home-Made Pornography OR, The Girl in the Red Photo and the Trouble She Caused

Posted in Love letters, Pornography, Writing with tags , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2014 by Jarrod Boyle

More than anything else, this piece has gotten me into a lot of trouble. And, I expect,  will continue to do so. Even though it was inspired by one woman, it has come to involve a number of others, none of whom were happy about it. Continue reading

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John Pilger vs the American Psycho

Posted in Film, Observation with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 15, 2012 by Jarrod Boyle

John Pilger, journalist and documentarian, criticized the film [The Hurt Locker] in The New Statesman, writing that “it offers a vicarious thrill via yet another standard-issue psychopath high on violence in somebody else’s country where the deaths of a million people are consigned to cinematic oblivion.” He compared the praise given to The Hurt Locker to the accolades given to 1978’s The Deer Hunter.[42] Continue reading

Man's Search for Meaning

Posted in Reading with tags , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2012 by Jarrod Boyle

War and Peace is haunting me. Continue reading

War and Peace

Posted in Reading, Real Men with tags , , , , , , , on April 27, 2012 by Jarrod Boyle

I finished it. Continue reading

Tolstoy Versus Napoleon

Posted in Reading, Real Men with tags , , , , , , , on February 24, 2012 by Jarrod Boyle

The thing about a book like War and Peace that first makes an impression on you is its size. Continue reading

War and Peace, p.242

Posted in Reading with tags , on October 24, 2011 by Jarrod Boyle

“He told them about his Schongraben action in just the way that those who take place in battles usually tell about them, that is, in the way they would like it to have been, the way they have heard others tell it, the way it could be told more beautifully, but not at all the way it had been. Rostov was a truthful young man, not for anything would he have deliberately told an untruth.

“He began telling the story with the intention of telling it exactly as it had been, but imperceptibly, involuntarily, and inevitably for himself, he went over into untruth. If he had told the truth to these listeners, who, like himself, had already heard accounts of attacks numerous times and had formed for themselves a definite notion of what an attack was, and were expecting exactly the same sort of account – they either would not have believed him or, worse still, would have thought it was Rostov’s own fault that what usually happens in stories of cavalry attacks had not happened with him. He could not simply tell them that they all set out at a trot, he fell off his horse, dislocated his arm, and ran to the woods as fast as he could to escape a Frenchman. Besides, in order to tell everything as it had been, one would have to make an effort with oneself so as to tell only what had been. To tell the truth is very difficult, and young men are rarely capable of it.”

Policemen, Bears and Brothels

Posted in Reading with tags , , , , on September 16, 2011 by Jarrod Boyle

 “…what on Earth did they do?” asked the countess. Continue reading

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